Worshiping the Triune God: The Greeting

Today we continue to reflect on the worship of our Triune God.  In my last blog post, I talked about the Call to Worship.  We are a gathered people.  God calls us to worship him in Spirit and in truth.  So for all those who respond to his call, God blesses.  These words of God spoken near the beginning of the worship service are often called the Greeting.  We haven’t always included a Greeting in our worship services, but we’re doing so more often these days, as a reminder that God himself is present with us in the sanctuary.  And he reveals his presence through his word.  For example: “May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all.” (2 Corinthians 13:14 NIV)  As James K. A. Smith writes, “So having been called, we are welcomed.  The yearning for God that is implanted in us as creatures is not an instigation to strive after a deity who refuses to be caught; rather, the Creator in whom we find our ‘rest’ is only all too eager to welcome us into communion.  Like the father of the prodigal son who daily ventured to the end of the lane, looking for the wayward one to return, embracing him upon arrival, so God calls us and welcomes us a the very beginning of worship.” (Desiring the Kingdom [Baker Academic], 168)  Actually, this is one of the elements of worship that struck me the first time I attended a Reformed worship service.  As I heard the Greeting it became abundantly clear that God was the focus of my praise.  The worship service is a gathering of Christians for fellowship, but even more it is a gathering of Christians to worship the Lord of heaven and earth, in whom we find our help and salvation.  “In short,” writes Smith, “God’s welcome is a gracious way of reminding us of our utter dependence, cutting against the myths of self-sufficiency that we’ve been immersed in all week long.” (169)  Let us continue to worship our Triune God!

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One thought on “Worshiping the Triune God: The Greeting

  1. Pingback: The best part of the worship service | 4th Point

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